God Is Our God (The Hope of Job)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In the Book of Job, we will find the healing will of God, as well as the destructive and devastating will of Satan. In Christendom, some interpolate that God was the one who inflicted Job and his family with great devastation, pain, suffering, and even the death of his children. However, this claim is irreverent and opposite to the true love of God. God is the God of all hope and deliverance, for it was Satan who encroached on Job’s life and devastated his entire being and his family and his farm.

Job 1:1, 8, and 2:3:
-1: THERE was a man in the land of UZ, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared {respected} God, and eschewed evil.
-8: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?
-3: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.

Amazingly, many people after reading these verses displaying in a three-fold manner God’s complete confidence in Job, so much so that He said there is none like him in the earth, and yet people still find deficiency in Job. They read through his tragedies and start nitpicking at his perfect walk with God, as they begin finding fault with every single thing he said and did, as well as slandering his children. In so doing this disservice to God’s Holy Word and His Beloved Job, they somehow must think that they are smarter than God, forming opinions in direct opposition to God’s Word.

Job’s hope in the coming Redeemer turned his life around and bolstered his strength to believe for healing, blessings, and for God’s refuge with His spiritual hedge of protection. Job’s hope presented him with godly inspirations and foresight as he anticipated the return of his Savior, which helped him to believe for even better tomorrows by way of having an understanding of the coming of his own resurrection.

Job 19:25:
For I know that my redeemer liveth {in the heart of my understanding}, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth:

The hope of Job gave him lively anticipation of the coming of Jesus Christ, his Redeemer. At the time of this verse, Job was recovering from a devastating storm from Satan. As Job passed through this horrible devastation, he was able again to look beyond the circumstances to envisage his Redeemer’s day of total deliverance.

Job left us a great example to also anticipate our release, always; for our God is a God of deliverance and our Savior is an invincible Savior of hope for our souls.

Job 19:26:
And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God.

Job is referring to his resurrection, and although he realized that his body would someday return back into dust, he also knew and believed in his heart that in the resurrection he would see his God face to face. Job believed that in the latter days, he would surmount to stand upon the Earth hand in hand with his Savior, and that he would also see his God, as Job stood clothed in a new resurrected body that will be impervious to destruction forever and ever.

Job 19:27:
Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.

Not another means not as a stranger or an unsaved person, who will be having a rude awakening someday, but as someone who patiently waited in hope to joyfully see his God, someone who truly knew Him intimately, and someone who hoped for his Redeemer to come and redeem. Job knew that even after his death and corruption back into dust, he would have a complete standing with God and with his Redeemer with an incorruptible body.

Life on this Earth is short in the scope of eternity; for the life of man in the Bible is called a vapour, and/or a blade of grass that is here today and gone with the wind in a moment of time (I Peter 1:24, James 4:19). As Job, we have only our life to walk with God, and have only a short space of time to open our hearts to experience our Redeemer, yet we have the assured hope of eternity to enjoy the rewards for our believing actions that we take today.

James 5:11:
Behold, we count them happy {blessed} which endure {through life’s trials and temptations}. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful {compassionately generous}, and of tender mercy.

Job lived through a horrendous situation, yet he stayed focused on the hope he had to stand again, alive with his Redeemer ― and he believed that he was most definitely going to see God with his own eyes, and be endowed with a new resurrected body. Job was blessed, not because he endured through the onslaught of evil, but because he overcame adversity. At the end of his troubles he became extremely blessed because God doubled his abundance and rewarded him richly (Job 42:10–17). Yet there is more to come than the blessings he received after his tragedies because in his resurrection he will see his God, walk hand in hand with his children and Redeemer, enjoy his rewards throughout eternity, and be among the people of his time who believed to eternally inherit the Earth. Today, we have the hope to be with our Redeemer and to see our God in His heavenly home, to behold the “the God of {all} hope” (Romans 15:13) “face to face” (I Corinthians 13:12).

Psalms 48:14:
For this God is our God for ever and ever: he will be our guide even unto death.

Let us take a closer look at the last phrase: he will be our guide even unto death. This phrase can sometimes be misconstrued to imply that God guides His children unto death. Then, as one is armed with this conclusion, he feels constrained to acknowledge and pronounce that, “Death must-needs be a part of life, and thus death must be the only way of man.”

However, this is not the correct understanding because our God is the God and Creator of life!

The words even unto death mean even over or even through death, because death is never a blessing from God; in truth death is called an enemy (See below I Corinthians 15:26), not a long lost friend welcoming man home like is heard in some funeral services. God will guide us through to our heavenly home of eternity! This is why the middle section of this verse says, God is our God for ever and ever, because even after death there is a resurrection, we will be in the gathering together, and eternal life is to be received and eternally enjoyed for ever and ever.

If Christ does not return before our last breath, then we will be gathered up together when Jesus returns to raise us up to eternally be with God (I Thessalonians 4:14–18). However, Christ may return at any moment, and so our hope is to never die, but either way we will be guided into eternity, sustained by the loving hands of our Creator, and in this, there is comfort because God is always our God!

God values His relationship with His children whom He has chosen even before the world began (Ephesians 1:4). Our unending relationship with God our Creator will continue and guide us through the eternity of eternities, and we will forever appreciate God in all His fullness and His abundance.

The last chapter of a Christian man or woman’s life does not end at the grave, but at the time of the gathering together their life will continue through all of eternity, triumphant over death, and thus the Psalmist boldly proclaims, God is our God forever and ever!

Job anticipated his rising up from the grave and overcoming death, for God was his delight, and again will be his delight, and he will also walk with him who is his future hope, his Redeemer and Arbitrator.

Job 14:13–17:
-13: O that thou {God} wouldest hide me in the grave, that thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past {the wrath that is revealed in the Books of Daniel and Revelation}, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me {after the wrath, at the Resurrection of the Just}!
-14: If a man die, shall he live again? {YES!} All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come {of receiving his new body}.
-15: Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee {from out of the grave}; thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands {of resurrecting}.
-16: For now thou numberest my steps: dost thou not watch over my sin? {To forgive and cleanse.}
-17: My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and thou sewest up mine iniquity {into the bag}.

Let us allow God’s comforting Word to speak directly to our hearts regarding death’s final end as well as the believer’s end. (The believer’s end will in actuality be a new beginning.)

The end of death and hell:

I Corinthians 15:26:
The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

Revelation 20:14:
And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire.
{So there is something beyond death and hellthe lake of fire.}

The believers’ end:

Romans 6:22:
Ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life.

John 6:40:
That every one which seeth the Son {perceives him either in person or in the Scriptures}, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day:

The above verses are straightforward, and they mean what they say. The hope of Job is also humanity’s hope, and with this hope, we have and enjoy comfort of knowing we have a destiny to look towards for our everlasting future.

Walking With Our Lord Jesus Christ

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

Matthew 14:28-32:
-28:  And Peter answered him {Jesus} and said, Lord, if it be thou, bid me come unto thee on the water.
-29:  And he said, Come. And when Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus.
-30:  But when he saw the wind boisterous, he was afraid; and beginning to sink, he cried, saying, Lord, save me.
-31:  And immediately Jesus stretched forth his hand, and caught him, and said unto him, O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt?
-32:  And when they were come into the ship, the wind ceased.

For the Apostle Peter, walking on the water with Jesus took a tremendous amount of courage and believing. In order for Peter to do this, he had to trust that this was available to do, and when Jesus said come, he came, but as Peter “came to his senses” he began to sink. When Peter took his eyes off Jesus – he fell into trouble. When Peter began looking around at the circumstances of life (that are always around), two things began to happen; one was that he saw the storm and simultaneously he forgot the promise (the Word) that Jesus gave him.

Secondly, the storm induced fear into his life.  Doubt, worry, and fear will defeat the promises that God’s healing Word reveals to us through Christ as we walk with him.

Two things that also need to be mentioned here is that Peter did not completely sink, he only began to sink.

Secondly, his Savior reached out to help him. The same lifeline is promised and given to us when we look to our Savior, to Jesus Christ, as we walk with him. In Hebrews 7:25 we read: “Wherefore he {Jesus Christ} is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him, seeing he ever liveth to make intercession for them.”

John 8:12:
Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.

The lesson here is that when and where we follow Jesus through the revealed Word of God, then we will be walking with him just as Peter had done that day on the sea. True – we will fall from time to time as we look at the circumstances around us, yet as Jesus reached out for Peter, Jesus can also pull us up and out of any worldly negative circumstances.

The Bible says that if we do not faint we will reap (Galatians 6:9). In other words, as we continue looking to our Savior, even when the circumstances around us seem bigger than our abilities, Jesus will come to our rescue. Jesus Christ is the way, the truth, and the life to the Father (John 14:6), because Jesus Christ is the mediator between God and man (I Timothy 2:5).

In Hebrews 13:8 we read: “Jesus Christ the same yesterday, and to-day, and for ever.” The mission of Jesus Christ has never changed; he will literally run to our aid when we are living through life’s challenges since we can accept him into our lives and look to his strength.

Philippians 4:13:
I {you} can do all things {promised in God’s Word} through Christ which strengtheneth me {through Christ who infuses us with his strength}.

Not only do we have the God-given right and permission to be more than conquerors (Romans 8:37), and triumph over life’s negative happenstance, but as we continue walking with Jesus Christ through an understanding of the Scriptures and by way of his daily inspiration, God will continue giving us daily victories “through our Lord Jesus Christ.”

My God Shall Supply

“Every person has different circumstances and daily needs, but God can and does care for each of us individually. But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus– Philippians 4:19. God promises in His Word that He will meet our every need, but seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things {that we need to sustain life — mentally, physically, and spiritually} shall be added unto you– Matthew 6:33. The true blessings of God come to us according to our believing His Word. By looking to God’s healing Word, and by prayer offered in the name of Jesus Christ, and with genuine thankfulness from the heart, we may also look for and expect that our God will be there for us with daily blessings, and we can in thankfulness recognize that His blessings are real.” ~LMJ~

The Hope of Job (The Shorter Version)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In the book of Job, we will find the healing will of God, as well as the destructive and devastating will of Satan. Throughout Christendom many believe (wrongly) that God was the one Who inflicted Job and his family with great devastation, pain, suffering, and even the death of his children. However, this is not true! God is the God of all hope and deliverance, and it was Satan who attacked Job and devastated his entire life. Today we would like to look at the hope of Job. It was his hope in the coming Redeemer that turned his life around and gave him the strength to believe for healing, blessings, and for God’s refuge with His spiritual hedge of protection.  Job’s hope presented to him godly inspirations and foresight, which helped him believe for better tomorrows as he anticipated the return of his Savior.

Job 19:25 – For I know that my redeemer liveth {in the heart of my understanding}, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth:

The hope of Job was in the coming of Jesus Christ (his Redeemer). At that point in time, Job was recovering from a devastating storm. As Job passed through this horrible devastation, he was able again to look beyond the circumstances, to his Redeemer, leaving us a great example to look for our deliverance always.

Job 19:26 – And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God:

Job is referring to his resurrection, and though he realized that his frail body would someday return back to dust, he also knew and believed in his heart that in his resurrection he would see his God. Job believed that in the latter days he would stand upon the earth with his Savior and see his God with his new resurrected body.

Job 19:27 – Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another {not another means not as a stranger, an unsaved person, but as someone who knows God intimately, and as someone who hoped for his Redeemer to come for him}; though my reins be consumed within me.

Job knew that even after his death, he would have a complete standing with God and with his Redeemer. Life on earth is short in the scope of eternity; the life of man in the Bible is called a vapor, or a blade of grass that is here today and gone tomorrow (I Peter 1:24). As Job, we have only our life to walk with God and our own Redeemer, yet we will have eternity to enjoy the rewards for our believing actions that we take today.

James 5:11 – Behold, we count them happy {blessed} which endure {through life’s trials and temptations}. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.

Job lived through a horrendous situation, yet he stayed focused on the hope he had – to stand with his Redeemer, and he believed that he was most definitely going to see God. Job was blessed because he endured through the onslaught of evil. At the end of his troubles he became extremely blessed because God doubled his abundance and rewarded him richly (Job 42:10-17). Yet there is more to come because in his resurrection he will see his God, walk hand in hand with his Redeemer, and enjoy his rewards throughout eternity. This is to be our end as well. Today, we have the hope to be with our Redeemer, and to see our God of all hope face to face.

Rejoice in the Lord (The Longer Version)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

The Epistle to the Philippians was written from Rome, and more specifically from a prison cell. Yet what is most notable throughout this wonderfully written inspiration is the mention of the words joy and rejoicing, used some sixteen times in four short chapters and each one is worthy of notation for our inspiration. In this study, we will be highlighting four verses from Philippians 4, commencing with “Rejoice in the Lord.”

Philippians 4:4:
Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice.

Joy is something God gives as a spiritual inner quality of life, while happiness is something man has and is conditional upon circumstance. For instance, if someone gave us a fancy sports coupe, we would certainly be happy, but over time as the car wore down and rusted out, the happiness would begin to dwindle, especially when it needed servicing. However, joy can continue to bubble over into rejoicing regardless of any circumstance for it is literally a gift of God as His healing Word continues making known to us the complete fullness of His joy.

I John 1:4:
And these things write we unto you {the Scriptures}, that your joy may be full.

The Scriptures are written so that we may know the complete fullness of having joy. We are not half full of joy, and as we come to God’s Word and allow Him to be our guide, He is able to show us with indisputable revelations that we are completely full of His spiritual joy. When Paul said Rejoice in the Lord alway he was referring to an overabundance of joy to the point that it was running over.

John 15:11:
These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full.

Rejoice is a repeat performance of having the fullness of joy. God’s instruction to us is not only to have rejoicing always, but also to rejoice again and again. Amazingly, Paul wrote Philippians 4:4 (above) from prison, yet he himself had this inner joy that was overflowing. He had the practical experience in understanding that God continually blessed his life and even though in his current situation he was incarcerated, his life continued to be full of joy and rejoicing.

Philippians 4:5:
Let your moderation be known unto all men. The Lord is at hand.

Moderation means that we are to let our patience and our self-control over life’s circumstances be known. The reason that we can have patience and self-control is first and foremost that we know the Lord is at hand; He is always with us so that we need not have fear. This indeed can inspire others, believers and unbelievers.

Philippians 4:6:
Be careful for nothing; but in every thing by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known unto God.

Be careful for nothing is old English and means to be anxious for nothing because God indeed will answer our heartfelt prayers. When we give to God our worries, our cares, our concerns, and our fears by supplication with thanksgiving, then we will learn to have complete trust that our care is truly in His hands.

Supplication means a specific need in one’s life, and the Scripture encourages us to make our exact needs known to God with thanksgiving, that is, to be thankful in advance for God giving us the special requests that we ask of Him (Mark 11:24, I John 5:14-15).

Philippians 4:7:
And the peace of God, which passeth all understanding, shall keep your hearts and minds through Christ Jesus.

The peace of God is another spiritual quality of life that God freely gives to us. This peace far surpasses all human understanding, yet we can know with complete assurance that we indeed have the peace of God in our lives. As we continue in our personal prayer life to God, He continues showing us His peace that not only is in our hearts but also is guaranteed to us through Christ (John 14:27, Romans 5:1). The word keep means to watch over and to guard (us), to spiritually protect our hearts and minds from fears, because we already have the joy and peace of God in our hearts.

The Epistle of Philippians is such an inspiring revelation that it compels us to praise God for His wonderful Word, and so as the Apostle said, Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I say, Rejoice.

Psalms 5:11:
But let all those that put their trust in thee rejoice: let them ever shout for joy, because thou defendest them: let them also that love thy name be joyful in thee.

Philippians 4:4 (The Amplified Bible):*
Rejoice in the Lord always [delight, gladden yourselves in Him]; again I say, Rejoice!

* Scripture taken from THE AMPLIFIED BIBLE.
The Amplified New Testament copyright (c) 1958, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation.
Used by permission.

“Joy is but the sign that creative emotion is fulfilling its purpose.” ~Charles Du Bos~

“Joy is not in things; it is in us.” ~Richard Wagner~

“To be simply ensconced in God is true joy.” ~Alfred A. Montapert~