God Is Our God (The Hope of Job)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In the Book of Job, we will find the healing will of God, as well as the destructive and devastating will of Satan. In Christendom, some interpolate that God was the one who inflicted Job and his family with great devastation, pain, suffering, and even the death of his children. However, this claim is irreverent and opposite to the true love of God. God is the God of all hope and deliverance, for it was Satan who encroached on Job’s life and devastated his entire being and his family and his farm.

Job 1:1, 8, and 2:3:
-1: THERE was a man in the land of UZ, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared {respected} God, and eschewed evil.
-8: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?
-3: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.

Amazingly, many people after reading these verses displaying in a three-fold manner God’s complete confidence in Job, so much so that He said there is none like him in the earth, and yet people still find deficiency in Job. They read through his tragedies and start nitpicking at his perfect walk with God, as they begin finding fault with every single thing he said and did, as well as slandering his children. In so doing this disservice to God’s Holy Word and His Beloved Job, they somehow must think that they are smarter than God, forming opinions in direct opposition to God’s Word.

Job’s hope in the coming Redeemer turned his life around and bolstered his strength to believe for healing, blessings, and for God’s refuge with His spiritual hedge of protection. Job’s hope presented him with godly inspirations and foresight as he anticipated the return of his Savior, which helped him to believe for even better tomorrows by way of having an understanding of the coming of his own resurrection.

Job 19:25:
For I know that my redeemer liveth {in the heart of my understanding}, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth:

The hope of Job gave him lively anticipation of the coming of Jesus Christ, his Redeemer. At the time of this verse, Job was recovering from a devastating storm from Satan. As Job passed through this horrible devastation, he was able again to look beyond the circumstances to envisage his Redeemer’s day of total deliverance.

Job left us a great example to also anticipate our release, always; for our God is a God of deliverance and our Savior is an invincible Savior of hope for our souls.

Job 19:26:
And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God.

Job is referring to his resurrection, and although he realized that his body would someday return back into dust, he also knew and believed in his heart that in the resurrection he would see his God face to face. Job believed that in the latter days, he would surmount to stand upon the Earth hand in hand with his Savior, and that he would also see his God, as Job stood clothed in a new resurrected body that will be impervious to destruction forever and ever.

Job 19:27:
Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.

Not another means not as a stranger or an unsaved person, who will be having a rude awakening someday, but as someone who patiently waited in hope to joyfully see his God, someone who truly knew Him intimately, and someone who hoped for his Redeemer to come and redeem. Job knew that even after his death and corruption back into dust, he would have a complete standing with God and with his Redeemer with an incorruptible body.

Life on this Earth is short in the scope of eternity; for the life of man in the Bible is called a vapour, and/or a blade of grass that is here today and gone with the wind in a moment of time (I Peter 1:24, James 4:19). As Job, we have only our life to walk with God, and have only a short space of time to open our hearts to experience our Redeemer, yet we have the assured hope of eternity to enjoy the rewards for our believing actions that we take today.

James 5:11:
Behold, we count them happy {blessed} which endure {through life’s trials and temptations}. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful {compassionately generous}, and of tender mercy.

Job lived through a horrendous situation, yet he stayed focused on the hope he had to stand again, alive with his Redeemer ― and he believed that he was most definitely going to see God with his own eyes, and be endowed with a new resurrected body. Job was blessed, not because he endured through the onslaught of evil, but because he overcame adversity. At the end of his troubles he became extremely blessed because God doubled his abundance and rewarded him richly (Job 42:10–17). Yet there is more to come than the blessings he received after his tragedies because in his resurrection he will see his God, walk hand in hand with his children and Redeemer, enjoy his rewards throughout eternity, and be among the people of his time who believed to eternally inherit the Earth. Today, we have the hope to be with our Redeemer and to see our God in His heavenly home, to behold the “the God of {all} hope” (Romans 15:13) “face to face” (I Corinthians 13:12).

Psalms 48:14:
For this God is our God for ever and ever: he will be our guide even unto death.

Let us take a closer look at the last phrase: he will be our guide even unto death. This phrase can sometimes be misconstrued to imply that God guides His children unto death. Then, as one is armed with this conclusion, he feels constrained to acknowledge and pronounce that, “Death must-needs be a part of life, and thus death must be the only way of man.”

However, this is not the correct understanding because our God is the God and Creator of life!

The words even unto death mean even over or even through death, because death is never a blessing from God; in truth death is called an enemy (See below I Corinthians 15:26), not a long lost friend welcoming man home like is heard in some funeral services. God will guide us through to our heavenly home of eternity! This is why the middle section of this verse says, God is our God for ever and ever, because even after death there is a resurrection, we will be in the gathering together, and eternal life is to be received and eternally enjoyed for ever and ever.

If Christ does not return before our last breath, then we will be gathered up together when Jesus returns to raise us up to eternally be with God (I Thessalonians 4:14–18). However, Christ may return at any moment, and so our hope is to never die, but either way we will be guided into eternity, sustained by the loving hands of our Creator, and in this, there is comfort because God is always our God!

God values His relationship with His children whom He has chosen even before the world began (Ephesians 1:4). Our unending relationship with God our Creator will continue and guide us through the eternity of eternities, and we will forever appreciate God in all His fullness and His abundance.

The last chapter of a Christian man or woman’s life does not end at the grave, but at the time of the gathering together their life will continue through all of eternity, triumphant over death, and thus the Psalmist boldly proclaims, God is our God forever and ever!

Job anticipated his rising up from the grave and overcoming death, for God was his delight, and again will be his delight, and he will also walk with him who is his future hope, his Redeemer and Arbitrator.

Job 14:13–17:
-13: O that thou {God} wouldest hide me in the grave, that thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past {the wrath that is revealed in the Books of Daniel and Revelation}, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me {after the wrath, at the Resurrection of the Just}!
-14: If a man die, shall he live again? {YES!} All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come {of receiving his new body}.
-15: Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee {from out of the grave}; thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands {of resurrecting}.
-16: For now thou numberest my steps: dost thou not watch over my sin? {To forgive and cleanse.}
-17: My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and thou sewest up mine iniquity {into the bag}.

Let us allow God’s comforting Word to speak directly to our hearts regarding death’s final end as well as the believer’s end. (The believer’s end will in actuality be a new beginning.)

The end of death and hell:

I Corinthians 15:26:
The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

Revelation 20:14:
And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire.
{So there is something beyond death and hellthe lake of fire.}

The believers’ end:

Romans 6:22:
Ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life.

John 6:40:
That every one which seeth the Son {perceives him either in person or in the Scriptures}, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day:

The above verses are straightforward, and they mean what they say. The hope of Job is also humanity’s hope, and with this hope, we have and enjoy comfort of knowing we have a destiny to look towards for our everlasting future.

God’s Blessings

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

The greatest things in life are free. A man may sell his soul, but he cannot buy eternal life, peace, joy, true inner happiness, or love. These are all gifts of God! We can stand in total awe of these gifts, and thoroughly enjoy them, for they far surpass any monetary value; as Philippians 4:19 reads “my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” The richest people on earth are those who have their needs supplied by God, day to day from the riches of His glory. Conversely, the people with large wallets may not be experiencing all the gifts and blessings of God in their lives. The Scripture in I Peter 1:8 informs us that we can “rejoice with joy unspeakable”; or joy beyond explanation, and this joy is an inner quality of life which is a spiritual manifestation of having God in Christ in our hearts while we are receiving and enjoying heavenly, God-given blessings.

II Corinthians 9:15:
Thanks be unto God for his unspeakable gift.

Although we cannot fully explain our inner joy and the unspeakable gift of God, we certainly can enjoy realizing unmistakable revelations of having these divine gifts. As we begin experiencing the true treasures of life, recognizing from whence they come and Who gave them, then we will be totally unfettered to give freely from our heartfelt inner joy and thankfulness to God.

God desires that we receive and grasp the realities of our heavenly blessings and treasures which He alone freely gives to men and women who are meek and humble to His healing Word and will.

Acts 20:35b-36:
-35b: . . . {The Apostle Paul said that we are} to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, how he said, It is more blessed to give than to receive.
-36:  And when he had thus spoken, he kneeled down, and prayed with them all.

The word blessed means to be happy or to have happiness. These words that Jesus spoke were remembered and talked about by the believers and are not recorded in the Gospels, only here in the Book of Acts. The commentaries have always assumed that verse 36 was narrated back to the Apostle Paul who knelt down and prayed with those he was teaching. However, from the Greek Text verse 36 is a continuation of the words and action of Jesus: “it is more blessed to give than to receive, and when he {Jesus} had thus spoken, he {Jesus} kneeled down, and prayed with them all.” This completes and fulfills the true understanding that Jesus was explaining in the Gospels, and because of the prayer they were experiencing happiness, and thus, they were expressing inner thankfulness to God. We can find nothing to suggest that the Apostle Paul did not also follow through with Christ’s example and prayed with those whom he was teaching in Acts 20. “More blessed {happy} to give than to receive” does NOT negate the blessings of receiving, rather it is in reference to the more we give thanks to God, the more we then can receive to then have to give again out from what He gives.

God always wants His children to be happy, and as we learn to discover His true blessings upon our lives, then happiness follows, and the first, the very first thing that we do is to return thankfulness to God. “. . . a threefold cord is not quickly broken (Ecclesiastes 4:12b).” The threefold cord as it concerns “giving and receiving” is that God first gives divine spiritual treasures to man, secondly man in return gives thankfulness, honor, and respect back to God, then thirdly God again returns to man the spiritual blessings in physical abundant realities. This is a threefold cord that God will honor and continue to reward. This is what Jesus and Paul were explaining by teaching and by example. “Every man shall give as he is able, according to the blessing of the LORD thy God which he hath given thee” (Deuteronomy 16:17). See how the blessing came first before any giving is even mentioned? This gives us a spiritual mindset on giving based on receiving blessings.

Psalms 146:5:
Happy {there is that word again} is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help, whose hope is in the LORD his God:

Let us look at Jacob in Genesis who sought God for his help and who spoke to Him in a way that at first blush would seem to be a little rude if not downright blasphemous (in the way some think, believe, and teach on tithing these days). Nevertheless, what he said to God was in fact following the theme of what we just read about from Acts and Deuteronomy, above, and the theme of God’s Blessings that we are looking at in this study and the reason for Jacob’s happiness that could be ours as well. “And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If {IF, IF} God will be with me, and {IF You} will keep me in this way that I go, and {IF You} will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, So that I come again to my father’s house in peace; then {THEN} shall the LORD be my God” (Genesis 28:20-21). Wow, really? Yes ― really, IF God would, then he would ― and God did, and he did.

Jacob went to the source of abundance, “The earth is the LORD’S, and the fulness thereof” (Psalms 24:1), he went directly to the LORD God, Who “giveth thee power to get wealth” (Deuteronomy 8:18) and said IF YOU SUPPLY ― THEN I WILL GIVE. “And all things, whatsoever ye shall ask in prayer, believing, ye shall receive” (Matthew 21:22); note, the only thing given here is a prayer, and a prayer is simply believing with thankfulness to God. It is from this request and understanding that Jacob not only lived an abundant life, but he concluded “of all that thou {God} shalt give me {of all things, whatsoever he asked in prayer and received} I will surely give the tenth {of what You give me} unto thee” (Genesis 28:22). See a Bible Byte study titled: Prayer with Thankfulness, which sheds light on this very subject of receiving from God in light of verses such as Matthew 21:22.

Psalms 46:7:
The LORD of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our refuge. Selah.

Jacob would contribute only after his receiving, and his life was indeed blessed; he was praying and being honest with God and being true to himself for the prospects of his inner happiness. Since the God of Jacob is still our refuge in today’s world, should we not want to learn from him and follow his example and belief system? Jacob indeed was a principled man and wanted to know why it is more blessed to give than it is to receive, and as he received from God first, he then realized it is also blessed to give in return from out the blessings he received (because they were not his in the first place making his giving much easier, it is like playing with house money). This is the reasoning behind cheerful giving (II Corinthians 9:6-9) because one will manifest happiness! “Happy is he that hath the God of Jacob for his help.”

It is not wrong to think as Jacob did — it is right to think as Jacob thought, it is not wrong to behave as Jacob did — it is right to behave as Jacob behaved, it is not wrong to believe as Jacob did — it is right to believe as Jacob believed, it is not wrong to say what Jacob did — it is right to say to God what Jacob said, in fact, God said of him “Jacob have I loved” (Romans 9:13). Furthermore, God did not curse Jacob for saying what he said, but blessed him. “Yet ye say, The way of the Lord is not equal. Hear now, O house of Israel; Is not my way equal? are not your ways unequal” (Ezekiel 18:25), in other words God’s way is right and Jacob proved to himself that God’s way was very equal and abundantly pleasing to him. Man’s way is to give first, God’s way is to receive first; man’s way is unequal, God’s way is equal. Man’s way is unbalanced and although God’s way may at first seem unbalanced and narrow-minded in man’s mind, it is actually perfectly balanced, as Jesus stated “strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it” (Matthew 7:14). I ask, have we found God’s way, His equal way? God’s way turns the tables, so-to-speak, and rights one’s course into true godliness, “godliness is profitable {PROFITABLE} unto all things” (I Timothy 4:6).

Truth (which makes one free,― John 8:32) purposely inspires the joy of giving from within the heart; error drains the joy of giving from the heart to become an uninspired, compulsive and legalistic function.

“For I desired mercy, and not sacrifice; and the knowledge of God more than burnt offerings” (Hosea 6:6). Sacrifice and burnt offerings were based on giving something in the prospect of getting something (i.e., a quid pro quo/tradeoff), while God desires mercy and knowledge which assures more. In fact, Jesus said of Hosea 6:6 “go ye and learn what that meaneth, I will have mercy, and not sacrifice” (Matthew 9:13). Mercy means the withholding back of that which is deserved, like a punishment and condemnation for a past sin, while God gives something so much grander, such as total forgiveness, love, mercy, peace, grace, and an abundant life; “no good thing will he withhold from them that walk uprightly” (Psalms 84:11). These kinds of treasures we can come to know and experience and receive when we understand that it is He Who gives us not simply a tradeoff but more abundance because He “is able to do exceeding abundantly above all that we ask or think” (Ephesians 3:20). A nutshell version: When your giving is a sacrifice, it is not what our God of love intended. “Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, or with ten thousands of rivers of oil? shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul? He hath shewed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God” (Micah 6:7-8).

Who would not want to walk humbly with God and know for certain that He is blessing them personally simply because He loves them? “I have loved thee with an everlasting love: therefore with lovingkindness have I drawn {called} thee” (Jeremiah 31:3). Who would not want to give from their personal God-given blessings with which He has blessed them? We receive blessings in order that we may enjoy an abundant life that comes directly from the ebb and flow of receiving from God and therein we are enabled to enjoy a heart of giving without having shortage or making sacrifices. From a biblical perspective, Jacob’s spiritual joy and physical happiness opened up to him the flowing simplicity of godly abundance, and is the foundation of discovering why it is more blessed to give than to receive because it is the key to more of what is free from God.

It certainly is easier to give out of what God blesses one with than to give out of what you have to start with and just may need to live on in the first place. When God becomes your God as He became Jacob’s, then the true perspective of life with God in your life will become living and real and life becomes a joy worth singing about. It is more blessed to give and receive Jacob’s way, which just happens to be God’s way! Yes, this is why it is thankworthy to pray with happiness and thank our heavenly Father. Jesus and Paul never taught “with effort you have worked, so freely give,” rather they taught God’s children, “freely ye have received, freely give” (Matthew 10:8).

Psalms 81:1:
Sing aloud unto God our strength: make a joyful noise unto the God of Jacob.

When we, the children of God, live our lives in this perfect harmony of receiving and giving, then the greatest treasures in life become ever more available and real to us. Then God’s Blessings continue coming in and we can experience genuine spiritual happiness living our lives in all the joy God originally intended.

Psalms 35:27-28:
-27: Let them shout for joy, and be glad, that favour my righteous cause: yea, let them say continually, Let the LORD be magnified, which hath pleasure in the prosperity of his servant.
-28: And my tongue shall speak of thy righteousness and of thy praise all the day long.

“We are justified, not by giving anything to God . . . but by receiving from God, what Christ hath done for us.” ~William Gurnall~

For more on this topic, see: The Seeds of Authentic Abundance (What Is Not in the Scriptures Is so Often Just as Important as What Is in the Scriptures!) and The Fullness of God (The First Principle)

Ask and It Shall Be Given

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

 Matthew 7:7:
Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you:

This is a wonderful section of Scripture. Yet how often do we simply ask? In the Book of James 4:2 it says “. . . ye have not, because ye ask not.” Sometimes asking may be a difficult thing for us to do because we normally earn the things that we have, and for some unknown reason asking almost seems wrong. Yet, in Matthew, Jesus was teaching that it is perfectly all right to ask when we have a need in our lives.

James 1:5-6a:
-5: If any of you lack wisdom, let him {beg, cry, and whine: no, it does not say that, it says} ask of God, that {Who} giveth to all men liberally {in simplicity, with a readiness of heart}, and upbraideth not {without faultfinding}; and it shall be given him.
-6a: But let him ask in faith {believing faith}. . .

When we pray what do we do? We ask! But is an answer to prayer honesty that simple to receive from God? Yes, it most definitely is! God’s Word says repeatedly to ask, and when we do, “it shall be given.”

Matthew 7:8:
For every one {including you and me} that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth, and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

Often receiving things that are greater than our means appears to be either too difficult or downright impossible to acquire (Matthew 19:26). Inadvertently people can project this same kind of difficulty into their believing when hoping or desiring to receive blessings from God, so when they do ask, they will ask in a cloud of doubt. Nevertheless, it is always God’s will and good pleasure to take care of us. God always wants us to be happy and to have what we need to live abundantly.

There are times that we may ask and not receive, and without understanding God’s Word, we can suspect that God really does not answer prayer. However, James 4:3 says “Ye ask, and receive not {and this is the reason they “receive not”}, because ye ask amiss, that ye may consume it upon your lust.” God not only supplies our needs when we ask, He usually goes beyond what we ask just to bless us; however, God will never supply greed (greed is something that men thirst after and acquire on their own), and in the Book of James it says this is asking “amiss.”

The Bible encourages the children of God to ask, seek, and knock, and to believe that He is not only willing, but He is also able to give (Romans 4:21). Then the Word of God says you will receive, find, and the door will be opened into the abundance that God truly awards to His children.