Exodus – Revealing Our True Passover

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In Christendom we normally think of the Passover as a Jewish festival or holiday, and for the most part the word Passover hardly comes up except when talking about the last supper. Today we will see that Jesus Christ is not only our true Passover but that he is our exodus and redemption from the bondage of sin. The word Exodus means a way out, a departure (from bondage). The children of Israel were living as slaves under horrendous conditions in Egypt and God was going to set them free and bring them into the Promised Land, and to commence this deliverance God initiated the Passover.

The Passover lamb had two major components, one was the body itself, and two was the blood. In the very night that Israel left Egypt they sprinkled the Passover lambs’ blood on their doorposts and ate the flesh. The blood was not simply used to allow death to pass over their homes; the blood was for the forgiveness of their sins, while the flesh (body) when eaten was for their healing. This is why during the forty years in the wilderness they were not sick.

In Exodus 12:11 the Passover is called “the LORD’S Passover.” God gave the children of Israel two wonderful things that strengthened their frail minds and bodies for the task and journey ahead, forgiveness in order that they may have a good conscience to believe God, and healing so they could go the distance through the barren desert. They were to have a Passover once a year, as a reminder of their redemption from slavery and sin; this was to help strengthen their believing and enjoyment in having the God-given freedom to choose their destinies without oppression.

John 1:36 – And looking upon Jesus as he walked, he {John the Baptist} saith, Behold the Lamb of God!

John was a Levite, and as a Levite he was a priest of the Most High God. John the Baptist in the above verse pointed out to Israel the true Passover Lamb of God. The lambs were symbolic, but the Lamb of God would redeem Israel and the world from the bondage of sin for our eternity and would become our spiritual exodus and entrance to the right hand of God.

Luke 9:31 – Who {Moses and Elijah spoke to Jesus in a “vision”} appeared in glory, and spake of his {Jesus’} decease which he should accomplish at Jerusalem.

The word “decease” is the Greek word exedon and means exodus. Jesus’ exodus for humanity would be accomplished at Jerusalem. The word “accomplish” means to complete, to fill to the brim, and when Jesus Christ gave himself for us he became the Passover for the entire world, this is why in the Christian Church we do not need to sacrifice lambs. Jesus Christ was the final sacrifice; he fulfilled – once for all – our eternal exodus into his own heavenly glory.

Our Passover – Jesus Christ – he has delivered us from spiritual death to eternal life, he redeemed us from the bondage of sin (and sins), and to the righteousness of God.

Knowing our Passover will give us a clear conscience to walk daily, moment by moment with our heavenly Father.

I Corinthians 5:7b – . . . For even Christ our Passover is sacrificed for us:

During the last hours prior to Jesus’ crucifixion he initiated the communion which represents for all of us his accomplishments that would be perfected and accomplished at Jerusalem. When Jesus was crucified his precious blood ran down his cross at the doorpost and threshold of eternity, giving us an eternal entrance into the promised land and home of His Holiest, with the gift of eternal redemption that daily abides within our very hearts.

I Peter 2:24 – Who {Jesus Christ} his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should {now} live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

What He Actually Did for “Our Sins” (What Did I Get out of It? Five Sonship Rights for Living Large!)

For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s- I Corinthians 6:20. Many Christians probably could not count how often they have heard the phrase ’Jesus died for our sins,’ as the price for our salvation. However, there is so much more to this than we know with a cursory reading of our Bibles. I can read about five specific things that Jesus did for our sins. 1) Jesus gave himself for our sins, 2) he bore our sins, 3) he was the propitiation (or the payment) for our sins, 4) he died for our sins, and 5) he purged us of our sins. In Christian literature, these biblical phrases have been run together for so many centuries that the uniqueness and the significance of each of them have never been thoroughly uncovered. Without knowing the difference between these five statements, they all, if truth were told, only reveal to us platitudes of vagueness, when what Jesus did for us is so astonishing. If we ferret out these phrases and individually examine the true spiritual significance of each one separately, then we will begin to clearly see the purpose behind the work of Jesus Christ to give men and women their God-given rights of 1) sanctification, 2) redemption, 3) righteousness, 4) reconciliation, and 5) justification.

You See:

Jesus Christ: gave himself for our sins (Galatians 1:4), so we then* would be sanctified (Hebrews 10:10).

Jesus Christ: on the cross bore our sins (I Peter 2:24, Colossians 2:14), so we then* would be redeemed (Galatians 3:13).

Jesus Christ: was the propitiation for our sins (I John 4:10), so we then* would be righteous (Romans 3:25–26, Romans 5:19).

Jesus Christ: died for our sins (I Corinthians 15:3), so we then* would be reconciled (Romans 5:10–11).

Christ Jesus: was raised up from among the dead, to purge us of our sins (I Corinthians 15:17), so we then* would be justified (Romans 4:25).

*Then at those moments in time – so we would be free from our sins from now till forever, so that we could live sinless in eternity with our Savior clothed with those five large heavenly rights, paid for with the perfect price, from Jesus’ perfect work, and for you and me the perfect prize was earned!” ~LMJ~

Please – No Condemnation – OK? (The Longer Version)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

It is unfortunate and ironic that after some Christians become saved they begin to condemn themselves for either a sin committed 20 years ago or the one they committed this morning before breakfast. This propensity towards self-condemnation is within our nature, hence the difficult time accepting continual forgiveness in Christ. In I John 1:9 we read, “If we confess our sins, he {our loving Heavenly Father} is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

Forgiveness is as close to us as simply asking our Heavenly Father for it and then accepting that we are cleansed from all unrighteousness.

In Romans chapter 7, we have an interesting verse of Scripture that sheds light on this subject:

Romans 7:19:
For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.

Wow, does this verse sound familiar to you at all? Often the state of affairs of many Christian men and women who desire to do good for the Lord is unsuccessful ― they try, they fail, and they try and fail to be good again and again. The average Christian panics and tries to find and then practice works of repentance to cover up for their sins and shortcomings in order to feel good enough to walk again with God. Nevertheless, he or she keeps on Romans 7:19-ing, and so a cycle begins that appears will never end with continual condemnation. Sometimes entire lifetimes can be consumed in this endless dilemma that all too often then becomes a way of life.

All this confusion and mental anguish over condemnation and sin comes about by not realizing that God not only forgives but that He also totally forgets; it is only we that choose to remember what God has forgiven, forgotten, and cleansed.

John 3:18a:
He that believeth on him {on Jesus Christ} is not condemned. . .

And, if we are not condemned, then, the truth is ― we are not condemned. By the way, this is why we have a Savior!

Jesus took our sins, our condemnations, our shortcomings, and our faults to his cross and buried them there at Calvary (John 1:20 and I Peter 2:24), yet man feels so inadequate at times, that he tries to dig them up and cloak himself with his old nature (see Romans 6:4 and Colossians 1:20–22). But by doing so, he denies to himself his new life and nature in Christ, which is given to shine forth from his inner heart (see Romans 8:1–18, II Corinthians 5:17, and Colossians 1:27; 3:1–2).

John 3:18a (The Amplified Bible):*
He who believes in Him {Jesus Christ} [who clings to, trusts in, relies on Him] is not judged [he who trusts in Him never comes up for judgment; for him {the believer} there is no rejection, no condemnation ― he incurs no damnation].” Well, praise the Lord!

Too many Christians do not believe what Jesus came to do for them (or have never seen this section of Scripture above) and imagine that God is angry or, at the very least, upset with them, and fear John 3:18b is written to them, though it is specifically addressed to unbelievers:

John 3:18b (The Amplified Bible):*
. . . But he who does not believe (cleave to, rely on, trust in Him {Christ}) is judged already [he has already been convicted and has already received his sentence] because he has not believed in and trusted in the name of the only begotten Son of God. [He is condemned for refusing to let his trust rest in Christ’s name.]

Many Christians become indoctrinated with relentless teachings of hellfire, brimstone, and condemnation and begin accepting the second half of John 3:18 as their lot in life, all the while refuting the freedom from condemnation received through Christ’s redeeming work. This relief from condemnation should reign supreme in the foundation of our soul, as we believe on the completed work of Jesus Christ.

Psalms 32:1:
BLESSED is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

Psalms 103:12:
As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us.

Well since God has forgiven us and cast our sins far away, then this should be our outlook as well. So what can be done that will help us remember that we are in the graces of our loving Heavenly Father? Thank God, for the Epistle and doctrine of Romans, for Romans covers this inner conflict of utter, self-inflicted condemnation in detail, giving believers an out, a refreshing way to break this tedious and often endless cycle of life-draining condemnation.

Romans 8:1a:
THERE is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus. . .

This verse does not say, “There is therefore now condemnation,” but, “NO CONDEMNATION” and this is the will of God. Condemnation also means judgment, for there is therefore now NO judgment, and thus no fear of judgment to anticipate either now or in our future from our loving heavenly Father (see Romans 5:9, and I Thessalonians 1:9–10, 5:9). Believing this places us with them which are in Christ Jesus and permits Christ Jesus to genuinely be our Savior from condemnation and judgment. Knowing this and this alone can help make our lives free. By no means was God wasting His time having Romans 8:1 written to us because it cost Him everything, including enduring the death of His Son, Jesus Christ, to free our lives from condemnation and to redeem our lives back into the loving and forgiving arms of our Heavenly Father. Rather than thinking on condemnation, on the sin nature, and on our inadequacies, let us ponder on a wonderful section of Scripture that is spiritually awe-inspiring from the Amplified Bible:

Philippians 4:6–9 (The Amplified Bible):*
-6: Do not fret or have any anxiety about anything, but in every circumstance and in everything, by prayer and petition (definite requests), with thanksgiving, continue to make your wants known to God.
-7: And God’s peace [shall be yours, that tranquil state of a soul assured of its salvation through Christ, and so fearing nothing from God and being content with its earthly lot of whatever sort that is, that peace] which transcends all understanding shall garrison and mount guard over your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.
-8: For the rest, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is worthy of reverence and is honorable and seemly, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely and lovable, whatever is kind and winsome and gracious, if there is any virtue and excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think and weigh and take account of these things [fix your mind on them].
-9: Practice what you have learned {from the above} and received and heard and seen in me {for the above is what the Apostle Paul thought on in his mind}, and model your way of living on it, and the God of peace (of untroubled, undisturbed well-being) will be with you.

In verse 6 above we read, continue to make your wants known to God and only someone who does not harbor condemnation in his heart will have the boldness and confidence to ask God with a believing mind in expectation of truly receiving.

I John 3:21:
Beloved, if our heart condemn us not, then have we confidence toward God.

I John 5:14–15:
-14: And this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us.
-15: And if we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him.

Once our petitions are offered to God freely without condemnation then we will begin receiving whatsoever we ask! We are currently heaven-bound and have been freed from condemnation to enjoy the eternal graces of our Creator. These things we can relish in the heart of our hearts and don in our minds because this is the truth of the Scriptures and “thus saith the Lord!”

So, Please – No Condemnation – OK!

* Scripture taken from THE AMPLIFIED BIBLE.
The Amplified New Testament copyright (c) 1958, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation.
Used by permission.

The Right to Our Redemption

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

I Peter 2:24a – Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree . . .

Previously we saw that Jesus gave himself for our sins, offering himself in place of man, and that because of his unselfish act we have received the complete right to God’s sanctification – we are set apart for heaven! Today we will further see that after Jesus gave himself for our sins, that he indeed received them, bearing them all the way to his cross (Colossians 2:14); this now gives us the absolute right to claim our whole and complete redemption.

Galatians 3:13 – Christ hath redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree:

Galatians shows us that our redemption came by Christ hanging on that tree, and I Peter shows us that when he was on that tree (the cross), he himself was bearing (carrying) our sins in his own body. The result of this completed work of Jesus Christ was to present humanity with the spiritual and eternal right from God to be legally and permanently redeemed. Redemption is now our right as the children of God because of the suffering that Jesus Christ went through when he gave himself, bearing our sins in his own body, giving of himself completely, the righteous for the unrighteous, the sinless for the sinful, so that the unredeemed may be totally redeemed. We are now redeemed and have the God-given right to claim our redemption. Redeemed in Galatians 3 above means to buy up (or back) from the power or possession of someone (the Devil, Acts 26:18), to purchase, and then to also release the purchased possession (us; Ephesians 1:14, 2:2) from bondage, so that we may live our lives immersed in God’s divinely given grace.

Galatians 5:1 – STAND fast therefore in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free, and be not entangled again with the yoke of bondage.

Jesus Christ made available to us almost unimaginable freedom to walk with our heavenly Father to a much greater degree than ever before, because we are redeemed. Have you ever redeemed a coupon or a token for a prize? Well Jesus Christ carried our sins across the threshold of extreme pain and torture to redeem us completely back to God (we are the prizes he sought after and won) from the powerful grip of the Adversary. Jesus received unimaginable beatings and whippings before he even went to the cross in order for him to be our complete Savior and now we forever belong to God. Without the shedding of blood there is no redemption (Hebrews 9:22) and so our lives have been bought and paid for with the price of redemption: the life and blood of Jesus, the most perfect man to ever walk on this earth and grace it with his presence and life.  We now can stand before God or the Adversary without fear because we have the right of redemption.

Ephesians 2:18-19:
-18:  For through him {Jesus} we both have access by one Spirit unto the Father.
-19:  Now therefore ye are no more strangers and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints {God’s consecrated and redeemed children}, and of the household of God;

Jesus Christ has redeemed us by bearing our sins: so we do not need to bear them any longer! Now and forever we are no more estranged to God, for we are fellowcitizens of His household, and have complete access to the Father, as complete as any child would have to his own father.