God Is Our God (The Hope of Job)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In the Book of Job, we will find the healing will of God, as well as the destructive and devastating will of Satan. In Christendom, some interpolate that God was the one who inflicted Job and his family with great devastation, pain, suffering, and even the death of his children. However, this claim is irreverent and opposite to the true love of God. God is the God of all hope and deliverance, for it was Satan who encroached on Job’s life and devastated his entire being and his family and his farm.

Job 1:1, 8, and 2:3:
-1: THERE was a man in the land of UZ, whose name was Job; and that man was perfect and upright, and one that feared {respected} God, and eschewed evil.
-8: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil?
-3: And the LORD said unto Satan, Hast thou considered my servant Job, that there is none like him in the earth, a perfect and upright man, one that feareth God, and escheweth evil? and still holdeth fast his integrity, although thou movedst me against him, to destroy him without cause.

Amazingly, many people after reading these verses displaying in a three-fold manner God’s complete confidence in Job, so much so that He said there is none like him in the earth, and yet people still find deficiency in Job. They read through his tragedies and start nitpicking at his perfect walk with God, as they begin finding fault with every single thing he said and did, as well as slandering his children. In so doing this disservice to God’s Holy Word and His Beloved Job, they somehow must think that they are smarter than God, forming opinions in direct opposition to God’s Word.

Job’s hope in the coming Redeemer turned his life around and bolstered his strength to believe for healing, blessings, and for God’s refuge with His spiritual hedge of protection. Job’s hope presented him with godly inspirations and foresight as he anticipated the return of his Savior, which helped him to believe for even better tomorrows by way of having an understanding of the coming of his own resurrection.

Job 19:25:
For I know that my redeemer liveth {in the heart of my understanding}, and that he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth:

The hope of Job gave him lively anticipation of the coming of Jesus Christ, his Redeemer. At the time of this verse, Job was recovering from a devastating storm from Satan. As Job passed through this horrible devastation, he was able again to look beyond the circumstances to envisage his Redeemer’s day of total deliverance.

Job left us a great example to also anticipate our release, always; for our God is a God of deliverance and our Savior is an invincible Savior of hope for our souls.

Job 19:26:
And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God.

Job is referring to his resurrection, and although he realized that his body would someday return back into dust, he also knew and believed in his heart that in the resurrection he would see his God face to face. Job believed that in the latter days, he would surmount to stand upon the Earth hand in hand with his Savior, and that he would also see his God, as Job stood clothed in a new resurrected body that will be impervious to destruction forever and ever.

Job 19:27:
Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes shall behold, and not another; though my reins be consumed within me.

Not another means not as a stranger or an unsaved person, who will be having a rude awakening someday, but as someone who patiently waited in hope to joyfully see his God, someone who truly knew Him intimately, and someone who hoped for his Redeemer to come and redeem. Job knew that even after his death and corruption back into dust, he would have a complete standing with God and with his Redeemer with an incorruptible body.

Life on this Earth is short in the scope of eternity; for the life of man in the Bible is called a vapour, and/or a blade of grass that is here today and gone with the wind in a moment of time (I Peter 1:24, James 4:19). As Job, we have only our life to walk with God, and have only a short space of time to open our hearts to experience our Redeemer, yet we have the assured hope of eternity to enjoy the rewards for our believing actions that we take today.

James 5:11:
Behold, we count them happy {blessed} which endure {through life’s trials and temptations}. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful {compassionately generous}, and of tender mercy.

Job lived through a horrendous situation, yet he stayed focused on the hope he had to stand again, alive with his Redeemer ― and he believed that he was most definitely going to see God with his own eyes, and be endowed with a new resurrected body. Job was blessed, not because he endured through the onslaught of evil, but because he overcame adversity. At the end of his troubles he became extremely blessed because God doubled his abundance and rewarded him richly (Job 42:10–17). Yet there is more to come than the blessings he received after his tragedies because in his resurrection he will see his God, walk hand in hand with his children and Redeemer, enjoy his rewards throughout eternity, and be among the people of his time who believed to eternally inherit the Earth. Today, we have the hope to be with our Redeemer and to see our God in His heavenly home, to behold the “the God of {all} hope” (Romans 15:13) “face to face” (I Corinthians 13:12).

Psalms 48:14:
For this God is our God for ever and ever: he will be our guide even unto death.

Let us take a closer look at the last phrase: he will be our guide even unto death. This phrase can sometimes be misconstrued to imply that God guides His children unto death. Then, as one is armed with this conclusion, he feels constrained to acknowledge and pronounce that, “Death must-needs be a part of life, and thus death must be the only way of man.”

However, this is not the correct understanding because our God is the God and Creator of life!

The words even unto death mean even over or even through death, because death is never a blessing from God; in truth death is called an enemy (See below I Corinthians 15:26), not a long lost friend welcoming man home like is heard in some funeral services. God will guide us through to our heavenly home of eternity! This is why the middle section of this verse says, God is our God for ever and ever, because even after death there is a resurrection, we will be in the gathering together, and eternal life is to be received and eternally enjoyed for ever and ever.

If Christ does not return before our last breath, then we will be gathered up together when Jesus returns to raise us up to eternally be with God (I Thessalonians 4:14–18). However, Christ may return at any moment, and so our hope is to never die, but either way we will be guided into eternity, sustained by the loving hands of our Creator, and in this, there is comfort because God is always our God!

God values His relationship with His children whom He has chosen even before the world began (Ephesians 1:4). Our unending relationship with God our Creator will continue and guide us through the eternity of eternities, and we will forever appreciate God in all His fullness and His abundance.

The last chapter of a Christian man or woman’s life does not end at the grave, but at the time of the gathering together their life will continue through all of eternity, triumphant over death, and thus the Psalmist boldly proclaims, God is our God forever and ever!

Job anticipated his rising up from the grave and overcoming death, for God was his delight, and again will be his delight, and he will also walk with him who is his future hope, his Redeemer and Arbitrator.

Job 14:13–17:
-13: O that thou {God} wouldest hide me in the grave, that thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past {the wrath that is revealed in the Books of Daniel and Revelation}, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me {after the wrath, at the Resurrection of the Just}!
-14: If a man die, shall he live again? {YES!} All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come {of receiving his new body}.
-15: Thou shalt call, and I will answer thee {from out of the grave}; thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine hands {of resurrecting}.
-16: For now thou numberest my steps: dost thou not watch over my sin? {To forgive and cleanse.}
-17: My transgression is sealed up in a bag, and thou sewest up mine iniquity {into the bag}.

Let us allow God’s comforting Word to speak directly to our hearts regarding death’s final end as well as the believer’s end. (The believer’s end will in actuality be a new beginning.)

The end of death and hell:

I Corinthians 15:26:
The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.

Revelation 20:14:
And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire.
{So there is something beyond death and hellthe lake of fire.}

The believers’ end:

Romans 6:22:
Ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end everlasting life.

John 6:40:
That every one which seeth the Son {perceives him either in person or in the Scriptures}, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day:

The above verses are straightforward, and they mean what they say. The hope of Job is also humanity’s hope, and with this hope, we have and enjoy comfort of knowing we have a destiny to look towards for our everlasting future.

Ruth – Revealing Our Redeemer

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

Ruth 4:14-15a:
-14: And the woman {Ruth} said unto Naomi {her mother-in-law}, Blessed be the LORD, which hath not left thee this day without a kinsman {redeemer} that his name may be famous in Israel.
-15a: And he shall be unto thee a restorer of thy life, and a nourisher of thine old age: . . .

Although the Book of Ruth contains only four chapters, a wealth of knowledge and understanding is inlaid throughout regarding redemption. The word “kinsman” means the next of kin who has the right of redemption. Ruth, a Gentile, had a husband who was from Israel, and when her husband died, Ruth was released (because of the laws and customs of that day) from any inheritance or possessions or any legal rights that her husband had in Israel.

She was told by Naomi to return back to her home and to her gods, but Ruth said: “Entreat me not to leave thee, or to return from following after thee {Naomi was returning back home to Bethlehem}, for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God;” (Ruth 1:16). This is the statement that made Ruth a great woman, a virtuous woman (Ruth 3:11), and Boaz said of her: “The LORD recompense thy work, and a full reward be given thee of the LORD God of Israel, under whose wings thou art come to trust (Ruth 2:12).

What a wonderful statement for man of God to say to a Gentile, and Gentiles were at that time considered unclean and vile.

To the question “who can find a virtuous woman?”, Boaz found one in Ruth,* who learned to have great trust in God. She had the qualities of a virtuous woman which can be read in Proverbs 31:10-31.

Boaz first needed to redeem her former husband’s inheritance back, which he did, then he would be free to marry her; this would give her the redemption of the eternal inheritance that the hope of all Israel had in and for the Redeemer. The Redeemer would be famous in Israel and be the restorer of life ─ eternal life!

The son of Ruth and Boaz was in the direct bloodline of King David (Ruth 4:21-22), and David was in the direct line of Mary the mother of Jesus Christ. Without Ruth and her faith, trust, and confidence in God we would not have a Savior!

Ruth had such an important and intricate part in the coming of Christ that she not only got her name recorded in the royal (kingly) lineage of Jesus Christ (Matthew 1:5), she was the only woman besides Mary to be mentioned in the genealogies of Jesus Christ in the Gospels.

In Matthew 1:16 we read: “And Jacob begat Joseph the husband of Mary, of whom was born Jesus, who is called Christ.” There is a huge error in translation here, because the word “husband” in the Greek Text is the word father. Mary’s father was named Joseph; Mary’s husband was also named Joseph. Joseph, Mary’s husband’s father was named Heli (Luke 3:23), while Mary’s father was named Jacob. Joseph was not the father of Jesus Christ, God was! And in this (understanding of the genealogy of Mary, and knowing the story of Ruth), we can receive incredible insights about our Redeemer ─ Jesus Christ.

Galatians 4:4-5a:
-4: But when the fulness of time was come, God sent forth his Son, made of a woman, made under the law,
-5a: To redeem them that were under the law, . . .

Who was under the Law? Israel was, and through Mary being the mother of Jesus, Jesus was born to be the only redeemer of Israel, who redeemed them from the Law. As Boaz redeemed Ruth so she could receive her rightful inheritance, Jesus in the same way redeemed all of Israel to receive their promised inheritance that God promised to Abraham and the prophets who followed him. After Jesus fulfilled the Law and redeemed Israel, God’s ultimate plan of redemption went into effect for the redemption of all humanity.

Galatians 3:13-14a:
-13: Christ hath redeemed us {not just Israel but the entire world} from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangeth on a tree:
-14a: That the blessing of Abraham might come {also} on the Gentiles through Jesus Christ; . . .

Anyone who was not under the Law, namely every human being that wasn’t in the fold of Israel was under the curse. But when Jesus fulfilled the Law and redeemed Israel, God’s divine plan of redemption for the entire world went into effect to give all people who will simply believe, their eternal inheritance to be in him who is the prophesied “restorer of thy life,” our Redeemer ─ Jesus Christ!

*(See our study, titled: A Virtuous Woman.)

I AM THAT I AM

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

For so many, God is simply an intangible Being with various titles, concepts, and ideas that hold vague meanings and implications. People sometimes refer to God as the man upstairs or the great I AM or the spirit in the sky, while others speculate, I know that there is something (or someone) out there (or up there) because I can see the order and perfection of life all around, but whatever power it is or wherever that power may originate, I just cannot grasp its real source. Some of us may have thought of God in suchlike terms before knowing Jesus Christ, “the Prince of life” (Acts 3:15), who introduced our searching hearts to His Majesty’s loving embrace and eternal purpose.

One could see all the works of man and easily believe that there is no God, but how can he look up into the starry heavens or view the perfection of life all around and still believe there is no God? The more we understand God via knowing Jesus Christ, the greater our spiritual lives grow as our union with the heavenly Father and with nature itself begins harmonizing with tranquility. All of the Prophets in the Old Testament preached about Christ and through knowing him, God becomes more magnified and detailed.

Exodus 3:14:
And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.

The most basic understanding of these words I AM THAT I AM means that God cannot deny His own existence. Simply put ― God is Who He is. The Apostle Paul said of himself in I Corinthians 15:10 “by the grace of God I am what I am.” Paul could not deny who he was, and that he was who he was only by the grace of God; it is the same with us, we are who we are only by the grace of God, for He is our Maker. Even Popeye understood who he was, “I yam what I yam and that’s all what I yam, I’m Popeye the sailor man,” (“toot, toot!”). It is no mystery understanding who God is; it is a mystery why so many people do not know who God is when Jesus Christ our Savior reveals Him to our inner hearts.

Man is truly something to behold from God’s perspective; Hebrews 2:6-9 records that the Son of God as well as Man were made just “a little lower than the angels.” The Hebrew word for angels in Hebrews 2 is Elohim and is the word for God, corresponding to the Greek word Theos, not angels. This is a huge mistranslation, which has greatly lowered expectations. Angels is the Hebrew word malak corresponding to the Greek word aggelos.

Man was made a little lower than the Creator of the universe, which is actually quite high up on the pedestal of God’s creation, higher than the angels who were created to be servants and ministers of God (Psalms 104:4, Hebrews 1:14). In contrast we, the children of God, are His sons and daughters (I John 2:1-2), and masterpieces of His creative “workmanship” (Ephesians 2:10), and the saved man becomes the crowning achievement of God. He “crowned us with glory and honour” (Psalms 8:4-5), creating nothing less than Christ in us, thus, we truly are what we are by the grace of God, and it is something to behold.

In Exodus chapter 3, God, by referring to Himself as I AM THAT I AM was showing Moses the true essence of Himself, and as Moses saw for himself the immensity of God, Moses began believing that he could rise up to his God‑given calling to deliver Israel.

God was preparing Moses to do some extraordinary exploits by way of delivering the children of Israel from the bondage of cruel slavery where they were imprisoned in the land of idol worship and servitude. Moses was also going to teach Israel about the spiritual realities of the Golden Thread, of him who was prophesied; the Christ, the awaited Messiah and Savior, and their rock of strength and hope (Deuteronomy 32:30-31).

I AM hath sent me unto you is not all that God exclusively told Moses to say to the children of Israel to inspire them to follow him off into the desert without food and water. Simply saying I AM hath sent me unto you was not (is not, and never will be) a magical phrase that mysteriously empowered Israel (or anyone else for that matter) to get up and get going into the barren desert (that only happens in the movies).

I Corinthians 10:4:
And {the children of Israel} did all drink the same spiritual drink {given by Moses}: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them {or rather who came after them}: and that Rock was {is, and will always be} Christ.

Moses began revealing the Messiah to the children of Israel (Deuteronomy 18:15, Acts 3:22-23). Then, as the Israelites began to figuratively drink and savor the comforting words that flowed from the mouth of Moses, they began perceiving the subject of all true prophecy, the rock Christ who came after them, as is recorded for posterity in the Gospels.

The hope of the coming of Christ was what inspired them to get moving over to the Promised Land where their Redeemer would come to redeem them. Jesus Christ became known through the spoken Word of God by Moses. This is how Moses strengthened Israel to the point that they also began believing in He Who could not deny Himself, in He Who said to Moses: I AM.

Hebrews 11:6:
But without faith {believing faith} it is impossible to please him {God}: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.

The reward itself inspired Israel, as well as Moses, to boldly go through the sweltering desert to the other side, to where the promise awaited, to the place of hope, to home, and to their destiny. Within the heart of their hearts they had the knowledge of Christ (who is the Word, John 1:14) who not only followed after them in the fullness of time, but to the very place where he would redeem, in their Promised Land of milk and honey.

Hebrews 11:24-27 (The Amplified Bible):**
-24: [Aroused] by {believing} faith Moses, when he had grown to maturity and become great, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter;
-25: Because he preferred to share the oppression [suffer the hardships] and bear the shame of the people of God rather than to have the fleeting enjoyment of a sinful life.
-26: He considered the contempt and abuse and shame [borne for] the Christ (the Messiah Who was to come) to be greater wealth than all {ALL} the treasures of Egypt, for he looked forward and away to the reward {the eternal reward that God gives}.
-27: [Motivated] by {believing} faith he left Egypt behind him, being unawed and undismayed by the wrath of the king {Pharaoh}: for he never flinched but held staunchly to his purpose and endured steadfastly as one who gazed on Him Who is invisible.

The Greek word for faith is pistis, and means believing faith, of which Christ is man’s author and finisher, (Hebrews 12:2), and if one is in need of more faith, then faith will be found through knowing Jesus Christ in the Word of God, “Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God” (Romans 10:17). By Moses choosing to believe in Christ, he chose an apparent life of hardship with the bound slaves of Egypt. He walked away from Pharaoh’s household and the life of luxury and looked to the invisible God of his conscious mind Who comforts and rescues from fear and rewards believing-faith in Christ.

Moses’ standing as a leader in Egypt was perhaps similar to that of the Apostle Paul who regarded his social standing as a blameless Pharisee in the Law and being in the top echelon of his class (Philippians 3:4-10). Yet in comparison Paul counted it all as nothing but “dung, that I may win {or gain} Christ” (Philippians 3:8). Why? Paul and Moses, as well as you and I, have access to the “the riches of Christ” (Colossians 1:27), and the “treasures of wisdom and knowledge” (Colossians 2:3), leaving no comparison between being in Christ and life without him. Moses chose to place the rest of his life and future in Christ who was to him the prophesied spiritual rock who would follow, and with whose knowledge would strengthen him as well as Israel, as they were assured of a much better life. By believing-faith, Moses chose temporal hardships rather than to have the fleeting enjoyment of a sinful life in order to receive “a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory” (II Corinthians 4:17), more than Egypt could ever offer.

Exodus 3:15a:
And God said moreover unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, The LORD God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, hath sent me unto you. . .

Moses had much more to go on than simply to say I AM sent me unto you, but also to inform Israel that the same God their ancestors believed in and hoped on has sent me unto you. One blissful benefit that Moses received for choosing to believe was that he spent personal time with God the Creator. As Moses enjoyed his time with the God of his life and hope, he learned from His actual voice the realties of the coming Redeemer and Moses grew to know the love of his life would indeed be his Messiah.

Today we may also experience this kind of personal relationship with the Father and with Christ Jesus in the household of God; “Beloved, now are we the sons of God” (I John 3:2). “I will receive you, And will be a Father unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty” (II Corinthians 6:17-18).

**Scripture taken from THE AMPLIFIED BIBLE.
The Amplified New Testament copyright (c) 1958, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation.
Used by permission.

Finding Our Personal Savior

“The deeper one scrutinizes the Scriptures, the more dynamically Christ becomes recognized as our personal Savior, Redeemer, and link to heaven’s throne and to Him Who sits upon it, and then what he said becomes not a simple phrase, but a reality, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me- John 14:6. His footprints are everywhere inside of the Scriptures blazing a trail that he painstakingly paved with his own life being clearly marked throughout the prophecies and leading directly up to the Creator.” ~LMJ~

Looking Unto Jesus (The Shorter Version)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

Hebrews 12:1 – WHEREFORE seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us,

The “great cloud of witnesses” are the Old Testament believers talked about in Hebrews chapter 11. The witness of these believers was their faith, their positive believing faith in the coming of Jesus Christ that even today can be seen throughout the Bible. When studying the life of David for instance, we can see how he looked forward to the coming of his Redeemer, his Lord and Savior. We can discover the struggle he had against his sin nature to walk uprightly before his God and his human weakness in being just a man who tried to walk with God to the best of his abilities. We can see how David failed when he did not look to Jesus, but more important is that we can see him succeed whenever he believed God’s Word. These believers from the Old Testament were witnesses leaving us vivid examples of how to look to Jesus as they themselves did. “The race that is set before us” is to look to the finish line, it is to look to Jesus, for in him and with him is our continued access to God our heavenly Father, His grace, and His praise.

Hebrews 12:2 – Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is {now} set down at the right hand of the throne of God.

The Amplified Bible* reads Hebrews 12:2 as: “Looking away [from all that will distract] to Jesus, Who is the Leader and the Source of our faith [giving the first incentive for our belief] and is also its {believing faith’s} Finisher [bringing it to maturity and perfection]. He, for the joy [of obtaining the prize] that was set before Him, endured the cross, despising and ignoring the shame, and is now seated at the right hand of the throne of God.” Today we can look to Jesus Christ and rely on his faith, his believing faith and receive his assurance that he is for us the author and finisher of our own believing faith. The word “author” means princely leader, the first and foremost. The word “finisher” means to bring to full maturity, to the complete end. Thus, the author and finisher of our believing faith is Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is first and the last, the alpha and omega, the author and giver of our desire to have his believing faith in our lives; he is the first and the last, completing and perfecting our own believing faith. This is what we may expect to receive by “looking unto Jesus” rather than looking to our own abilities or our own strength.

Acts 4:11-12:
-11:  This {Jesus Christ} is the stone which was set at nought {rejected} of you builders, which is become the head of the corner {of the spiritual Church and family of God Himself}.
-12:  Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved.

Today we have the blessed privilege to accept within our own heart the believing faith of Jesus Christ, who has been completely perfected in us through his believing actions that he took to his cross for us. We can believe on him and rely on his strength, as we continue “looking unto Jesus” throughout the revealed Word and will of God. When we look to Jesus, we will find the true spiritual presence and presents that God gives; this is the daily joy that He now sets before us.

* Scripture taken from THE AMPLIFIED BIBLE. The Amplified New Testament copyright (c) 1958, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation.
Used by permission.