Unrighteousness – Yucky / Righteousness – M’mm, M’mm Good!

If we confess our sins, he {God} is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness- I John 1:9. After our salvation, do we still fall prey to temptations and are we swayed by the sin nature? Yes, all Christians will be tempted, and blow it even after salvation, and it is at this point believers feel that they have lost their salvation, that their relationship with God has been severed, and condemnation thus begins reigning supreme in the conscious mind. So what do we do at this point to regain our good standing with God? From the time of our salvation, onward, until Christ returns, we simply confess our mistakes or shortcomings to God in prayer to receive forgiveness, thus cleansing all that yucky unrighteousness, and adding all that good stuff called righteousness (reread I John 1:9, above).” ~LMJ~

What He Actually Did for “Our Sins” (What Did I Get out of It? Five Sonship Rights for Living Large!)

For ye are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body, and in your spirit, which are God’s- I Corinthians 6:20. Many Christians probably could not count how often they have heard the phrase ’Jesus died for our sins,’ as the price for our salvation. However, there is so much more to this than we know with a cursory reading of our Bibles. I can read about five specific things that Jesus did for our sins. 1) Jesus gave himself for our sins, 2) he bore our sins, 3) he was the propitiation (or the payment) for our sins, 4) he died for our sins, and 5) he purged us of our sins. In Christian literature, these biblical phrases have been run together for so many centuries that the uniqueness and the significance of each of them have never been thoroughly uncovered. Without knowing the difference between these five statements, they all, if truth were told, only reveal to us platitudes of vagueness, when what Jesus did for us is so astonishing. If we ferret out these phrases and individually examine the true spiritual significance of each one separately, then we will begin to clearly see the purpose behind the work of Jesus Christ to give men and women their God-given rights of 1) sanctification, 2) redemption, 3) righteousness, 4) reconciliation, and 5) justification.

You See:

Jesus Christ: gave himself for our sins (Galatians 1:4), so we then* would be sanctified (Hebrews 10:10).

Jesus Christ: on the cross bore our sins (I Peter 2:24, Colossians 2:14), so we then* would be redeemed (Galatians 3:13).

Jesus Christ: was the propitiation for our sins (I John 4:10), so we then* would be righteous (Romans 3:25–26, Romans 5:19).

Jesus Christ: died for our sins (I Corinthians 15:3), so we then* would be reconciled (Romans 5:10–11).

Christ Jesus: was raised up from among the dead, to purge us of our sins (I Corinthians 15:17), so we then* would be justified (Romans 4:25).

*Then at those moments in time – so we would be free from our sins from now till forever, so that we could live sinless in eternity with our Savior clothed with those five large heavenly rights, paid for with the perfect price, from Jesus’ perfect work, and for you and me the perfect prize was earned!” ~LMJ~

Bringing in the New!

“The Old Testament requirements have been made void in Jesus Christ with a new covenant (i.e., New Testament) by his own blood on our behalf. He was the end of the Law, and hailed the beginning of God’s super, divine grace to accompany our own believing faith (Hebrews 12:2), and our entrance into receiving all the fullness and righteousness of our God. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth– Romans 10:4. Christ is the end of the law and if he is the end, then he is the end! Because Christ was the end of the Law, we are now given the righteousness of God by our simply believing in Jesus’ completed work on our behalf.” ~LMJ~

Jesus Christ in the Scriptures

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

In the book of Acts chapter 8 verse 30 we have the record of Philip who asked another man (a eunuch) a simple question. “Understandeth thou what thou readest?” This is a fair and honest question, do we understand what we read when reading the Bible? Earlier in another study we learned a little bit about the one great subject of the Scripture, Jesus Christ, without whom we do not have the key to unlock the Scriptures for we would miss the spiritual understanding that only Christ can give to the heart and soul of searching men and women. When Philip asked him if he understood what he was reading from the Scriptures, the man honestly replied: “How can I, except some man should guide me?” (Acts 8:31). The man was reading from the book of Isaiah 53, and he had many questions that Philip was able to answer. Let us pick up the story in Acts:

Acts 8:32-35:
-32:  The place of the scripture which he read was this, He was led as a sheep to the slaughter; and like a lamb dumb before his shearer, so opened he not his mouth:
-33:  In his humiliation his judgment was taken away: and who shall declare his generation? for his life is taken from the earth.
-34:  And the eunuch answered Philip, and said, I pray the, of whom speaketh the prophet this? of himself, or of some other man?
-35:  Then Philip opened his mouth, and began at the same scripture, and preached unto him Jesus.

Once we begin understanding that the Scriptures reveal Jesus Christ (not just in the Gospels), and we really began to recognize him throughout the Word, he begins revealing the true essence and realities of God to our minds. The word “humiliation” (in verse 33 above) relates to the physical punishment and torture that Jesus went through on our behalf, and that he, who knew no sin became sin for us, so that we might be made as righteousness as God is (II Corinthians 5:21).

King David also wrote about the hope of Christ’s coming throughout the Book of Psalms. The Apostle Peter in teaching about the resurrection of Christ on the day of Pentecost in Acts chapter 2 says of David that he always had Jesus Christ in the forefront of his thinking and writing.

Acts 2:25-26:
-25:  For David speaketh concerning him {recorded in the 16th Psalm}, I foresaw the Lord always before my face {by revelation}, for he is on my right hand, that I should not be moved:
-26:  Therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh shall rest in hope:

What gave David inner joy, continued hope, and a glad tongue was knowing his Lord and Savior from the written revelation of Scripture (II Peter 1:21). The Scriptures continue giving us joy, hope, and a glad tongue – the same joys that Jesus knew when speaking the Word of God, “for the joy of the LORD is your strength” (Nehemiah 8:10).

Luke 24:25-27:
-25:  Then he {Jesus} said unto them, O fools {“fools” simply means they were slow in their finding Christ in the Scriptures, Jesus was not insulting them, but making an observation}, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken:
-26:  Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?
-27:  And beginning at Moses {meaning: beginning from Genesis} and all the prophets {and ending at Malachi}, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself.

Entitlements

“Psalms 37:5-6 reads, Commit thy way unto the LORD; trust also in him; and he shall bring it {the desires of your heart, verse 4} to pass. And he shall bring forth thy righteousness as the light, and thy judgment as the noonday. Thy righteousness as the light means that you will feel wonderful and totally deserving, shining with effervescence because you have received the desires of your heart. Thy judgment as the noonday means that because you indeed did trust, delight, and commit your ways unto God, you are entitled and completely deserving to receive the desires of your heart from Him.” ~LMJ~