Please – No Condemnation – OK? (The Longer Version)

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

It is unfortunate and ironic that after some Christians become saved they begin to condemn themselves for either a sin committed 20 years ago or the one they committed this morning before breakfast. This propensity towards self-condemnation is within our nature, hence the difficult time accepting continual forgiveness in Christ. In I John 1:9 we read, “If we confess our sins, he {our loving Heavenly Father} is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.”

Forgiveness is as close to us as simply asking our Heavenly Father for it and then accepting that we are cleansed from all unrighteousness.

In Romans chapter 7, we have an interesting verse of Scripture that sheds light on this subject:

Romans 7:19:
For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do.

Wow, does this verse sound familiar to you at all? Often the state of affairs of many Christian men and women who desire to do good for the Lord is unsuccessful ― they try, they fail, and they try and fail to be good again and again. The average Christian panics and tries to find and then practice works of repentance to cover up for their sins and shortcomings in order to feel good enough to walk again with God. Nevertheless, he or she keeps on Romans 7:19-ing, and so a cycle begins that appears will never end with continual condemnation. Sometimes entire lifetimes can be consumed in this endless dilemma that all too often then becomes a way of life.

All this confusion and mental anguish over condemnation and sin comes about by not realizing that God not only forgives but that He also totally forgets; it is only we that choose to remember what God has forgiven, forgotten, and cleansed.

John 3:18a:
He that believeth on him {on Jesus Christ} is not condemned. . .

And, if we are not condemned, then, the truth is ― we are not condemned. By the way, this is why we have a Savior!

Jesus took our sins, our condemnations, our shortcomings, and our faults to his cross and buried them there at Calvary (John 1:20 and I Peter 2:24), yet man feels so inadequate at times, that he tries to dig them up and cloak himself with his old nature (see Romans 6:4 and Colossians 1:20–22). But by doing so, he denies to himself his new life and nature in Christ, which is given to shine forth from his inner heart (see Romans 8:1–18, II Corinthians 5:17, and Colossians 1:27; 3:1–2).

John 3:18a (The Amplified Bible):*
He who believes in Him {Jesus Christ} [who clings to, trusts in, relies on Him] is not judged [he who trusts in Him never comes up for judgment; for him {the believer} there is no rejection, no condemnation ― he incurs no damnation].” Well, praise the Lord!

Too many Christians do not believe what Jesus came to do for them (or have never seen this section of Scripture above) and imagine that God is angry or, at the very least, upset with them, and fear John 3:18b is written to them, though it is specifically addressed to unbelievers:

John 3:18b (The Amplified Bible):*
. . . But he who does not believe (cleave to, rely on, trust in Him {Christ}) is judged already [he has already been convicted and has already received his sentence] because he has not believed in and trusted in the name of the only begotten Son of God. [He is condemned for refusing to let his trust rest in Christ’s name.]

Many Christians become indoctrinated with relentless teachings of hellfire, brimstone, and condemnation and begin accepting the second half of John 3:18 as their lot in life, all the while refuting the freedom from condemnation received through Christ’s redeeming work. This relief from condemnation should reign supreme in the foundation of our soul, as we believe on the completed work of Jesus Christ.

Psalms 32:1:
BLESSED is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered.

Psalms 103:12:
As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us.

Well since God has forgiven us and cast our sins far away, then this should be our outlook as well. So what can be done that will help us remember that we are in the graces of our loving Heavenly Father? Thank God, for the Epistle and doctrine of Romans, for Romans covers this inner conflict of utter, self-inflicted condemnation in detail, giving believers an out, a refreshing way to break this tedious and often endless cycle of life-draining condemnation.

Romans 8:1a:
THERE is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus. . .

This verse does not say, “There is therefore now condemnation,” but, “NO CONDEMNATION” and this is the will of God. Condemnation also means judgment, for there is therefore now NO judgment, and thus no fear of judgment to anticipate either now or in our future from our loving heavenly Father (see Romans 5:9, and I Thessalonians 1:9–10, 5:9). Believing this places us with them which are in Christ Jesus and permits Christ Jesus to genuinely be our Savior from condemnation and judgment. Knowing this and this alone can help make our lives free. By no means was God wasting His time having Romans 8:1 written to us because it cost Him everything, including enduring the death of His Son, Jesus Christ, to free our lives from condemnation and to redeem our lives back into the loving and forgiving arms of our Heavenly Father. Rather than thinking on condemnation, on the sin nature, and on our inadequacies, let us ponder on a wonderful section of Scripture that is spiritually awe-inspiring from the Amplified Bible:

Philippians 4:6–9 (The Amplified Bible):*
-6: Do not fret or have any anxiety about anything, but in every circumstance and in everything, by prayer and petition (definite requests), with thanksgiving, continue to make your wants known to God.
-7: And God’s peace [shall be yours, that tranquil state of a soul assured of its salvation through Christ, and so fearing nothing from God and being content with its earthly lot of whatever sort that is, that peace] which transcends all understanding shall garrison and mount guard over your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.
-8: For the rest, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is worthy of reverence and is honorable and seemly, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely and lovable, whatever is kind and winsome and gracious, if there is any virtue and excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think and weigh and take account of these things [fix your mind on them].
-9: Practice what you have learned {from the above} and received and heard and seen in me {for the above is what the Apostle Paul thought on in his mind}, and model your way of living on it, and the God of peace (of untroubled, undisturbed well-being) will be with you.

In verse 6 above we read, continue to make your wants known to God and only someone who does not harbor condemnation in his heart will have the boldness and confidence to ask God with a believing mind in expectation of truly receiving.

I John 3:21:
Beloved, if our heart condemn us not, then have we confidence toward God.

I John 5:14–15:
-14: And this is the confidence that we have in him, that, if we ask any thing according to his will, he heareth us.
-15: And if we know that he hear us, whatsoever we ask, we know that we have the petitions that we desired of him.

Once our petitions are offered to God freely without condemnation then we will begin receiving whatsoever we ask! We are currently heaven-bound and have been freed from condemnation to enjoy the eternal graces of our Creator. These things we can relish in the heart of our hearts and don in our minds because this is the truth of the Scriptures and “thus saith the Lord!”

So, Please – No Condemnation – OK!

* Scripture taken from THE AMPLIFIED BIBLE.
The Amplified New Testament copyright (c) 1958, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation.
Used by permission.

Micah – Revealing Our Spiritual Strength

Written by Larry M. Jaynes:

As we are following along through the Old Testament we find a pattern emerging throughout, and that is that the people of God rejected His prophets and His Word over and again. Throughout, God continues showing His loving care, desiring that they would accept His deliverance.

God’s healing Word continues revealing to them their glorious future, and showing that eventually God would set things right by sending His Son who would quench the sin nature by giving his life. All of God’s wonderful mercies given to Israel became known as they acknowledged the Messiah’s coming.

In the Book of Micah, Jesus Christ was prophesied as the Ruler in Israel who would come forth from Bethlehem (Micah 5:2). The Messiah would be the king of lords and the strength that they would need to conquer their fears and shortcomings, and Jesus Christ would become our strength to daily enjoy our God’s presence.

In Micah, God delights in mercy towards believers:

Micah 7:18-19:
-18: Who is a God like unto thee, that pardoneth iniquity, and passeth by the transgression of the remnant of his heritage? {The “remnant” are those who would believe out of the nation of Israel.} he retaineth not his anger for ever, because he delighteth in mercy.
-19: He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths of the sea.

The more of God’s Word we come to know, the greater we begin to perceive our heavenly Father’s true characteristics of love. He is called the “God of love and peace” in II Corinthians 13:11; the word “of” in the Greek Text is in the genitive case because love and peace originated from God Himself.

Even though His people continued rejecting Him, He continued revealing revelations regarding the hope of the Savior coming and his day of deliverance.

Micah 5:4 – And he {Jesus Christ} shall stand and feed in the strength of the LORD, in the majesty of the name of the LORD his God; and they {believers} shall abide: for now shall he be great unto the ends of the earth.

As Jesus Christ receives his strength from God, he strengthens us today: “I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me” (Philippians 4:13). The strength that we receive originates with God, and Jesus Christ strengthens us with his very own strength that he receives from God.

We have the strength of Christ to continue walking daily with our heavenly Father.

Micah 6:8 – He {God} hath showed thee, O man, what is good; and what doth the LORD require of thee {and this is what God requires:}, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God?

It is Christ within who helps us walk humbly with God, strengthening our endeavors to do that which is just and to love with the love of God. This of course would fulfil the requirements God desires of us, perhaps not the requirements some people expect of Christians, but I am confident that we would rather be pleasing to God first.

Micah 7:7-8:
-7: Therefore I will look unto the LORD; I will wait for the God of my salvation: my God will hear me {when I pray to Him}.
-8: Rejoice not against me, O mine enemy: when I fall, I shall arise; when I sit in darkness, the LORD shall be a light unto me.

Ephesians 6:10 records, “Finally, my brethren, be strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might,” and in walking with our God we can acknowledge our Spiritual Strength (in Christ), and become more than conquerors with the inseparable “love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 8:37-39).

Forgiveness Is a Wonderful Thing

“In Psalm 32, David begins by expressing how blessed we are when we receive forgiveness, and then he goes on to show what happens when we do not ask for forgiveness as he did for a time. Finally, David got to the place in his life that he realized that all he had to do was acknowledge the error of his ways. It was then that David came to grasp that his God totally forgave him. David said unto Nathan {the Prophet}, I have sinned against the LORD {this is David, he was not confessing his sins to Nathan, but admitting that he sinned when he was confronted by the Prophet}. And Nathan said unto David, The LORD also hath put away thy sin– II Samuel 12:13. What could be more comforting to a sinner than to hear that God has already put away his or her sin? In Psalms 51:1-3 we read, Have mercy upon me, O God, according to thy lovingkindness: according unto the multitude of thy tender mercies blot out my transgressions. {This asked David of God in regard to what David had done to Uriah the Hittite and Bathsheba his wife; you can read the story from II Samuel chapter 11:1-24 on how David got Uriah killed so that he could get Bathsheba to be his wife.} Wash me thoroughly from mine iniquity, and cleanse me from my sin {David asks God}. For I acknowledge my transgressions: and my sin is ever before me. Well, once the thing is done, then it is done and one could live in condemnation a lifetime or admit to God that a sin has occurred and accept His forgiveness and get back into fellowship with God. The thing that helped David was his humbleness in accepting that The LORD also hath put away thy sin. This is one benefit we can be thankful for each day – that we have the privilege to accept God’s forgiveness, with the extra added benefit of knowing that when God forgives, He forgets (I John 1:9).” ~LMJ~

BLESSED Is He

BLESSED is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered– Psalms 32:1. In this Psalm we notice the first word BLESSED; this word means to have happiness in our life’s journey as God blesses our ways because we have not only found the promised Christ, but through him we walk with God which is a reason to be both blessed and happy. Transgression in the Hebrew Text relates to the thoughts and intents of the heart that lead away from the instructions of Scripture, yet thankfully Scripture shows us how to journey on a direct path that leads us to His wondrous Word through knowing Jesus Christ. When we realize our faults have taken us away from God, as the sin nature does so easily beset us– Hebrews 12:1, and we then realize that we have an advocate in His son because the blood of Jesus Christ his Son cleanseth us from all sin– I John 1:7, and we come back to God in prayer to receive our cleansing and forgiveness, God is always willing, ready, and able to forgive. If we confess our sins, he {God} is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness– I John 1:9. Then the Psalm goes on to say, whose sin is covered. In the Old Testament times sins were only covered, it is like tying a trash bag or putting refuse into an underground septic tank; we know there is something not so pleasant under there, but at least it is out of sight. Thankfully today in grace, God cleanses us from all unrighteousness, leaving the inside washed completely clean rather than simply covering them up, and thus, we really are blessed!” ~LMJ~